LACMA

On March 26th, I went to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in the Miracle Mile vicinity of Los Angeles to explore the exhibitions with a friend. Our main intention was to see the museums newest and most popular exhibition: Rain Room. On March 26th, I went to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) in the Miracle Mile vicinity of Los Angeles to explore the exhibitions with a friend. Established in 1910 by Howard F. Ahmanson, Anna Bing Arnold, and Bart Lyytton, LACMA has become the largest museum in the western United States. The museum holds more than 150,000 works, and, at the time of our visit, included exhibitions showcasing Islamic Art, Works of Africa, and 19th century art from Western European countries like Germany, France, and Austria. It was not until 1961 that LACMA was established as a museum; prior to this time, LACMA was part of the Los Angeles Museum of History, Science and Art. The culmination of philanthropic donations to LACMA came in the booming years of the 1980s where a $209 million in private donations was made while Earl Powell was director. Our main intention was to see the museums newest and most popular exhibition: Rain Room. Opening on November 1, 2015, the Rain Room is an immersive installation by the art collective Random International that “features continuously falling water, creating a cacophonous interior downpour that pauses wherever a human body is detected”. While some environmentalists may be awestruck at what appears to be a misuse of water in the midst of California’s severe water drought, there is no need to be heavily concerned. The Rain Room uses about 528 gallons of water within a self-contained system that continuously reuses the water supply throughout the entire run of the exhibition. It was an incredible experience for my friend and I. Walking through an area with pouring rain but not getting wet was a weird experience: your mind wants to think that you should get wet, but the dryness of your body gives an opposing testimony.

One Comment

  1. Berenice Contreras

    I’ve heard a lot about The Rain Room recently. It sounds like a great experience. I couldn’t imagine walking under rain without actually feeling the rain. It must have been a little confusing! I would have to agree with the environmentalist concerned with the misuse of water. I understand that they have this display in the most environmentally friendly way, however 528 gallons of water can really make a difference elsewhere.

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